TCM - Nas, De La Soul & "The Disaster Of Commercial Success"

achewon87
achewon87 Members Posts: 5,464 ✭✭✭✭✭
https://youtu.be/xycXyyA8-K4

Hip Hop celebrated the 20th anniversary of Rawkus’ influential release Soundbombing Vol. 1 this October. Soundbombing is credited with starting an indie rap revolution. It was billed as the ultimate guide to underground Hip Hop, which at the time, was a relatively new concept. Underground Hip Hop. 9th Wonder described its significance and explains why Nas’ It Was Written and De La Soul’s Stakes Is High represents the creation of a divide in Hip Hop culture.

Comments

  • a_list
    a_list Members Posts: 4,886 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Good drop...Yo, I was one of those that had both Stakes Is High and It Was Written....I could listen to Jeru going at Biggie and then listen to Big right after that..I wasnt one of those that got caught up in that divide..Never really got into the Soundbombing joints tho...

    Watched my boy go through it though...Sun went from liking Nas, Wu, Mobb Deep etc to straight Mos, Kweli, Monch, Atmoshere and The High and Mighty or something like that...I remember one time, this had to be late 96 early 97 we talking rappers and homing says what about Emenim, yo we all looked at dude and was like who?!!!..lol
  • THE_R_
    THE_R_ Members Posts: 3,444 ✭✭✭✭✭
    REALLY GOOD VIDEO...

    I NEVER REALLY GAVE THIS ? THOUGHT...
    B/C I WAS TRULY ENJOYING ALL THE RELEASES AT THE TIME...
    PLUS I HAD CIRCLES THAT ENJOYED UG & MAINSTREAM...
    BUT THIS REALLY HELPS PUT THINGS INTO PERSPECTIVE...
  • waterproof
    waterproof Members Posts: 9,412 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Stakes is High will go down as the warning before the Storm. A damn Great Album
  • king hassan
    king hassan Members Posts: 22,739 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I clearly remember these. Times.
  • Nechesh358
    Nechesh358 Members Posts: 276 ✭✭
    i sided more with the underground ? during these times. puffy was really the leader of the shiny commericalized ? and jayz was following right along. i was done with jay for a minute after vol 3.
  • Broddie
    Broddie Members Posts: 11,750 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Nechesh358 wrote: »
    i sided more with the underground ? during these times. puffy was really the leader of the shiny commericalized ? and jayz was following right along. i was done with jay for a minute after vol 3.

    I was done with Jay after Vol. 2 until Blueprint and I only initially gave BP a chance cause we rode with it in the whip fall 2001.

    But yeah that mafioso ? and sampling 80s pop tunes got ran into the ground quickly by the time of No Way Out.

    I detested Bad Boy and their sonic and fashion influence by '97. Sorry ass ? like The Firm album was a byproduct of how far over the top Puff and them took the mafioso conceit to the point of parody.

    Thank ? for Wu-Tang Forever and When Disaster Strikes that year. Everything else was aping Puff someway. Even Wyclef. Thankfully Pun and DMX breathed some much needed fresh air back into the game by the next year. Hip hop was in a really sorry state when it first went aggressively commercial after Big and Pac got got.

    At least the commercial afro centric or positive songs of the early 90s still kept some authenticity. Puff's style was blatant sell out ? .
  • Nechesh358
    Nechesh358 Members Posts: 276 ✭✭
    jay got me back with the dynasty. i didnt even wana hear it when it dropped but then my boy came thru n played it for me and i cud tell he was taking his sound in a different direction.

    co sign wu pun and x doing there thing. gang starr came with some heat too in 98. but some cats lost their careers trying to sell out. remember mic geronimo? his debut album was fire but for his 2nd album he had puff n trackmasters all over it. ? was trash and pretty much ended his career.
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Broddie wrote: »
    Nechesh358 wrote: »
    i sided more with the underground ? during these times. puffy was really the leader of the shiny commericalized ? and jayz was following right along. i was done with jay for a minute after vol 3.

    I was done with Jay after Vol. 2 until Blueprint and I only initially gave BP a chance cause we rode with it in the whip fall 2001.

    But yeah that mafioso ? and sampling 80s pop tunes got ran into the ground quickly by the time of No Way Out.

    I detested Bad Boy and their sonic and fashion influence by '97. Sorry ass ? like The Firm album was a byproduct of how far over the top Puff and them took the mafioso conceit to the point of parody.

    Thank ? for Wu-Tang Forever and When Disaster Strikes that year. Everything else was aping Puff someway. Even Wyclef. Thankfully Pun and DMX breathed some much needed fresh air back into the game by the next year. Hip hop was in a really sorry state when it first went aggressively commercial after Big and Pac got got.

    At least the commercial afro centric or positive songs of the early 90s still kept some authenticity. Puff's style was blatant sell out ? .

    You make some good points, but there was a mixtape scene in the mid/late 90s that was far from commercial. There was one tape in particular I had called Face Off by Doo ? and FunkMaster Flex

    DOO ? & FUNKMASTER FLEX - FACE/OFF
    Side A:
    01. Intro
    02. Rakim - It's Been A Long Time
    03. Busta - Put Your Hands
    04. Yvette Michelle - The Way I Feel
    05. Fat Joe & Big Punisher - Deep Cover '97
    06. Peter Gunz & Lord Tariq - Marmalade
    07. Wu Tang Clan - Scary Hours
    08. Don Black - Freestyle
    09. Smif-N-Wesson - Won-On-Won
    10. Ivory feat. Cru - Relax & Party (Remix)
    11. Cru & Lox - Live At The Tunnel
    12. Yvette Michelle - Something In The Way
    13. New Big Daddy Kane Joint
    14. SWV feat. Lil Cease - Love Like This
    15. Davina feat. Raekwon - So Good

    Side B:
    01. Uneek, Doo ? , Don Black & Noreaga - Above Water II
    02. Cru - Rhythm Bluntz
    03. Yvette Michelle - We Can Get Down
    04. Tracey Lee - Who Shot LR
    05. Puffy, Jay-Z & Notorious B.I.G. - Young G's
    06. Puffy feat. Foxy Brown - Friend
    07. Don Black - Freestyle
    08. Wu Tang Clan - Duck Season
    09. Da Mad Rapper/Producer Skit
    10. Tracey Lee - Got To Give It Up (Remix)
    11. Yvette Michelle - Crazy
    12. Puff Interlude


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3PlbXihDNE


    ^^^ I copped that tape circa July 1997.

    Doo ? had a couple of other tapes around the same time, Wopduizm and Wopduizm2

    In fact, the whole premise of the clip in the T/S is void when you consider that mix tapes were like the internet in the mid 90s.
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Here's Doo ? 's Summer 96 mixtape. If its true that Stakes Is High and It Was Written dropped on the same day, I think its reasonable to assert that this tape was out around the same time.


    Full tracklisting after the jump

    01. Doo ? – Intro
    02. Smoothe da Hustler & Trigga tha Gambler – Freestyle
    03. Fab 5 – Freestyle
    04. Busta Rhymes & Rampage – Freestyle
    05. Lord Finesse – Freestyle
    06. Sadat X – Freestyle
    07. Ed Lover – Freestyle
    08. Keith Murray & Smif n Wessun – Payin Dues
    09. Nas – Street Dreams
    10. Heltah Skeltah – Posses, Crews, Clicks & Clans
    11. Doo ? & Sun Dulfah – New York Love
    12. SWV – You’re the One (Doo ? RMX)
    13. Uneek – Diamonds
    14. Sadat X – Lump Lump
    15. A+ – All I See
    16. Trigga tha Gambler, Smoothe Da Hustler & DV Alias Khrist – My Crew Cant Go For That
    17. Real Live – Real Live (Remix) (Feat. Ghostface, Cappadonna, Lord Tariq & Killa Sin)
    18. Def Squad – Breaker 1, Breaker 2
    19. Busta Rhymes – Do My Thing
    20. Nas – If I Ruled The World
    21. Smoothe Da Hustler – Dedication
    22. Money Boss Players – Games
    23. Nas – Freestyle
    24. Nine & Uneek – Da Product
    25. Biz Markie – Studder Step
    26. Heather B & MOP – My Kinda ?
    27. DJ Mister Cee – One Time For the East Coast


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssgzAxI5dao&t=269s
  • Moore7s
    Moore7s Members Posts: 452 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I like the theory. My biggest issue would be 9th saying prior to 96 everyone listened to everything and I'm calling bs. By 94 there was already a pretty big divide between working class black folk and the street element. You can hear it on a song like every day people by arrested development('92). Id say after native tongues movement slowed down you could feel the rift happening. Stakes is high might have just been a culmination of sorts.
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Moore7s wrote: »
    I like the theory. My biggest issue would be 9th saying prior to 96 everyone listened to everything and I'm calling bs. By 94 there was already a pretty big divide between working class black folk and the street element. You can hear it on a song like every day people by arrested development('92). Id say after native tongues movement slowed down you could feel the rift happening. Stakes is high might have just been a culmination of sorts.

    Cosign.

    Eazy Duz It, Straight Outta Compton and Three Feet High & Rising came out within a few months of each other. Those albums were huge in my school and kids from both sides of the tracks liked them both.

    But by the early 90s you had groups like Arrested Development, Digable Planets, A Tribe Called Quest, etc.

    There was also a lot of stuff coming out of the West Coast like Too $hort, Ant Banks and Spice 1.

    I think you can trace it back to 1988, but by 1996 each region had its own distinct sound. And New York was more versatile than other regions. Not saying they were better, just more versatile.
  • Moore7s
    Moore7s Members Posts: 452 ✭✭✭✭✭
    5 Grand wrote: »
    Moore7s wrote: »
    I like the theory. My biggest issue would be 9th saying prior to 96 everyone listened to everything and I'm calling bs. By 94 there was already a pretty big divide between working class black folk and the street element. You can hear it on a song like every day people by arrested development('92). Id say after native tongues movement slowed down you could feel the rift happening. Stakes is high might have just been a culmination of sorts.

    Cosign.

    Eazy Duz It, Straight Outta Compton and Three Feet High & Rising came out within a few months of each other. Those albums were huge in my school and kids from both sides of the tracks liked them both.

    But by the early 90s you had groups like Arrested Development, Digable Planets, A Tribe Called Quest, etc.

    There was also a lot of stuff coming out of the West Coast like Too $hort, Ant Banks and Spice 1.

    I think you can trace it back to 1988, but by 1996 each region had its own distinct sound. And New York was more versatile than other regions. Not saying they were better, just more versatile.

    I like ny from the 90s as much as anyone else but I wouldn't say it was the most diverse. The south and the west coast were actually putting musicianship back into the tracks while ny was sampling and scratching.

    Let's try something new and stick to the o/p
  • MallyG
    MallyG Members Posts: 4,916 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Nechesh358 wrote: »
    jay got me back with the dynasty. i didnt even wana hear it when it dropped but then my boy came thru n played it for me and i cud tell he was taking his sound in a different direction.

    co sign wu pun and x doing there thing. gang starr came with some heat too in 98. but some cats lost their careers trying to sell out. remember mic geronimo? his debut album was fire but for his 2nd album he had puff n trackmasters all over it. ? was trash and pretty much ended his career.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IaywTEFadAY



    "Still Don't Nothin' Move But The Money!" LoL


    Crazy enough, I remember this like it was yesterday! It was a far cry from "Wherever You Are" and "It's Real".