Which of These Music Genres Was Most Influential in the "Creation "of Hip-Hop Music?

Plutarch
Plutarch Members Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited November 2017 in The Reason
Thoughts?

I really don't know.

In my limited knowledge, it seems like soul was a relatively distant influence. A

And funk's influence only came to the forefront relatively late (especially regarding P-funk and Westcoast, though of course, Eastcoast rappers from Rakim to Redman were flirting with funk as well).

And despite any dislike for or ignorance of disco, you can't deny how influential that genre was to the early history of hip-hop.

But it seems like the griots, the Dead Poets, Jamaican "toasting," and other spoken-word all had the most influence. People even include Ali in all of this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFidzk5MWwE

Which of These Music Genres Was Most Influential in the "Creation "of Hip-Hop Music? 17 votes

Spoken Word (e.g., Muhammad Ali?, etc.)
11%
ipittythefoolLowercase_G 2 votes
Funk (e.g., James Brown, etc.)
52%
dwade206leftcoastkevdondiHustleThaDonL.O.S.T.nujerz84LUClENListencloserNechesh358 9 votes
Disco (e.g, Chic, etc.)
17%
tompetrez3Lou Cyphertk_heuristics 3 votes
Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
17%
sapp08_2001CashmoneyDux5 Grand 3 votes
«1

Comments

  • Matike85
    Matike85 Members Posts: 4,527 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    You forgot Rock & Roll bruh
  • LUClEN
    LUClEN Members Posts: 20,559 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Funk (e.g., James Brown, etc.)
    Funky drummer
  • THE_R_
    THE_R_ Members Posts: 3,444 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • Stew
    Stew Members, Moderators, Writer Posts: 52,234 Regulator
    Probably funk and soul. Don't think u can just name one cause of all of the samples used.
  • playmaker88
    playmaker88 Members Posts: 67,905 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • AZTG
    AZTG Members Posts: 7,598 ✭✭✭✭✭
    When hip hop first started it was all about the beat and partied. There was some rapping going on but the rapping was secondary to the beat. People really didnt start rapping as we know it till bout 10 years after hip hop started, thats why I dont think we can say spoken word was one of the main influences of where hip hop originated.
  • Plutarch
    Plutarch Members Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Matike85 wrote: »
    You forgot Rock & Roll bruh

    I just wanted to focus on those four in particular, but do you think rock is more influential than the four I listed? If so, care to explain? Not disagreeing, just curious.
  • Plutarch
    Plutarch Members Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭✭✭
    THE_R_ wrote: »
    JAZZ & REGGAE

    Jazz? Care to explain?

    Reggae? Yeah.
    "When Did Reggae Become Rap?"

    When did Jamaican dance hall reggae become rap? Are we not putting the carriage before the horse? Contrary to what many may say Rap can trace its origins directly from Jamaican Dub Reggae & Jamaican style toasting. It is a fact that isn’t talked about by many in the main stream media but many of the early pioneers (DJ Herc) and newer rappers (Busta Rhymes, Notorious B.I.G and Redman) in the American rap era are Jamaican immigrants or children of Jamaican immigrants in NY. One does not have to look very far to see the relationship between the two as we now see rap and dancehall reggae merging. This would not be possible if there were not the similarities as the child is now beginning to return to the parent. Jamaican dejaying came out of a form a rhyming and talking over music called “Toasting”. Rapping began as a variation on the toasting

    Jamaican sound systems (Mobile Discotheques) have been toasting since the early 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. Jamaican toasting was developed at blues dances which were free dances mainly in Jamaican ghettos where sound systems battled each other playing American R& B, Jamaican Ska and Rock Steady. Popular dance venues included Foresters Hall, Twary Crescent (Duke, Sir ? Sound, King Edwards, Mighty Bell), & Central Road. Surprisingly some of the earliest signs of toasting can be found in songs by folk historian and entertainer the Honorable Dr. Louise Bennett-Coverley fondly known to many as “Miss Lou”.

    The sound systems had a Deejay whose primary responsibility was to play the records and then there was the MC who was responsible for setting the mood with the crowd by “toasting”. Record producers used to leave one side of a new 45 with just the instruments or “rhythm” which was called “the version of the song”. These versions are where many of MCs of the sound systems in Jamaica would do a rhyme or toast to entertain the audience. MC’s would battle each other (just like rappers did) to see who could do the best rhyme or toast. They would cover topics ranging from what people were wearing at the dance, to culture, politics and commentary. Like the early beginning of its predecessor rap; most of it was good natured and humorous. The rhyme started with phrases like ‘wuk it up man’.

    Ewart ‘U-Roy’ Beckford, King Sporty, Dennis Alcapone, Scotty, Prince Buster, Sir Coxsone, Duke Reid are all early leaders in toasting in Jamaica. They would be followed later by deejays like Big Youth, Jah Stitch and I Roy. They were followed by Yellowman, Charlie Chaplin and General Echo.

    Duke Reid was one of Jamaica’s most popular early DJ’s. He was known to wear outrageous costumes. His most popular costume was a dark cloak where he hid his cowboy holster and guns. You could also hear “toasting” on the radio during 1958- 1959 on the Treasure Isles time Radio Program with King Sporty.

    Many of the artists involved in the birth of rap in New York were either Jamaican or have Jamaican parentage. The seeds were planted for rap music when Jamaican Clive ‘Kool Herc’ Campbell migrated to the Bronx NY 1967 at age 13. He put together a sound system patterned off what he saw growing up in Jamaica and started to draw crowds to his dances. Influenced by the Jamaican style of toasting he used this technique on American R&B, funk, disco, soul and funk. During the song’s 30-40 sec instrumental break he would “toast”. He realized he needed a way to extend the instrumental break so he started to experiment with 2 turntables. He was the first to use two turntables techniques to extend the break by playing the same record. This allowed more ‘toasting’ which like its Jamaican counterpart encouraged people to dance. He pioneered “breaks” in songs. He recruited dancers as a part of his MC dance team. These dancers would be featured mainly during the breaks and would later be called break-dancers. Campbell was just one of the many Jamaicans who influence rap directly.

    Today we have Beenie man, Elephant man and Sean Paul who are now influencing Rap. Without a doubt Jamaican deejay style was the foundation for American rap music and needs to be recognized as such.

    A few Sources: Evolution of Rap by Steven Hager, The Rough Guide to Reggae by Steve Barrow, Cut N Mix by ? Hebdige, The Tennors (Rock Steady/Reggae group), Derrick Morgan (King of Ska).

    "When Did Reggae Become Rap?"
  • Plutarch
    Plutarch Members Posts: 3,239 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    But there are those who disagree. Couple of erroneous counterpoints to the above article:
    Lies. Hip Hop is 100% African American, no Jamaican influence.

    Hip Hop is 100% African American, not Jamaican and certainly not Puerto Rican. Hip Hop is a continuation of older African American genres, which happen to be Disco, Soul, Funk, and Jazz. All of those genres are 100% African American, not Jamaican, not Puerto Rican. The art of rapping descends from older African American oral traditions, not Jamaican toasting. Rapping descends from field hollers(slavery/sharecropping days), the dozens, signifying, African American poetry(For example, the movie Chiraq and its rhyme scheme would exist without Hip Hop), African American preachers and pimps, as well cats like Muhammad Ali, Rudy Ray Moore, James Brown, Pigmeat Markham and many others. All are African American. African Americans were break dancing in the early 1900s as evidenced in this very video. Hip Hop DJs descend from Disco DJs, both are African American, not Jamaican. Grafitti existed in the African American community in Philly before Hip Hop was even a thing. Latinos had no role in the creation of Hip Hop. They were nothing more than early non-black participants.

    In response to the above:
    thank you. I get tired of people always trynna lay claim to history that isn't theirs. Anyone who has truly studied the history of this country and the black folks of this country, they'd know this.
  • Matike85
    Matike85 Members Posts: 4,527 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Plutarch wrote: »
    Matike85 wrote: »
    You forgot Rock & Roll bruh

    I just wanted to focus on those four in particular, but do you think rock is more influential than the four I listed? If so, care to explain? Not disagreeing, just curious.

    The Punk Rock scene of the 70's until the earlier 80's help Hip Hop acceptance with White America ... 1950's & 1960's Rock & Roll influence Hip Hop because just like Rock & Roll it was created by Black People in America ...just like Rock & Roll its was consider Devil Music within the Black Community mainstream media who did not understand the struggle of Streets in the 70's,80's, & 90's.... And Just like Rock & Roll many people even Eminem himself consider himself Elvis of the Hip Hop. and just like Rock & Roll in the 1960's it's the most popular music and genre of its generation.

    g14imd8ceu7w.png
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    1*sIJRoyjRxeSQaIiwgjMVsA.gif

    What do David Bowie, Skrillex and Hanson have in common with Big Daddy Kane, Public Enemy and Kanye West?

    All of them have sampled music that was spotlighted on the Ultimate Breaks & Beats series, a collection of 25 vinyl albums featuring songs with unforgettable funky rhythms. The series launched in 1986 and became the foundation of hip-hop, dance and pop music for the next three decades and beyond.


    “Breaks” or “breakbeats” first emerged in the formative days of the early 1970s, when a DJ in the Bronx, New York named Kool Herc popularized a sound based around the hard funk drums of James Brown. Herc kept the dancefloor jumping by isolating parts of the records with the “breakdown” — typically in the form of a percussion solo. Since these sections would always generate the most excitement from the dancers, why not continue the energy using two copies of the record? Herc’s cutting-edge practice of extending the break led to the emergence of “break boys” (aka b-boys), who would take the opportunity to showcase their best dance moves during these passages, hence the term “break dancing.”



    This brilliantly effective DJ technique continued to evolve, as pioneers such as Afrika Bambaataa drew a big following with obscure, funky records that no one else thought to play. Grandmaster Flash mastered the technical aspects of the form, advancing the art of playing the same section of a song endlessly on two turntables — allowing MCs to keep the crowd entertained by chanting phrases over the beats. This vocal party-rocking eventually morphed into what we now consider rapping.

    https://medium.com/cuepoint/ultimate-breaks-beats-an-oral-history-74937f932026

    R-1075570-1190235838.jpeg.jpg



    https://www.discogs.com/sell/release/1075570?ev=rb
  • playmaker88
    playmaker88 Members Posts: 67,905 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Jazz think of the improv aspect
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    5 Grand wrote: »
    1*sIJRoyjRxeSQaIiwgjMVsA.gif

    What do David Bowie, Skrillex and Hanson have in common with Big Daddy Kane, Public Enemy and Kanye West?

    All of them have sampled music that was spotlighted on the Ultimate Breaks & Beats series, a collection of 25 vinyl albums featuring songs with unforgettable funky rhythms. The series launched in 1986 and became the foundation of hip-hop, dance and pop music for the next three decades and beyond.


    “Breaks” or “breakbeats” first emerged in the formative days of the early 1970s, when a DJ in the Bronx, New York named Kool Herc popularized a sound based around the hard funk drums of James Brown. Herc kept the dancefloor jumping by isolating parts of the records with the “breakdown” — typically in the form of a percussion solo. Since these sections would always generate the most excitement from the dancers, why not continue the energy using two copies of the record? Herc’s cutting-edge practice of extending the break led to the emergence of “break boys” (aka b-boys), who would take the opportunity to showcase their best dance moves during these passages, hence the term “break dancing.”



    This brilliantly effective DJ technique continued to evolve, as pioneers such as Afrika Bambaataa drew a big following with obscure, funky records that no one else thought to play. Grandmaster Flash mastered the technical aspects of the form, advancing the art of playing the same section of a song endlessly on two turntables — allowing MCs to keep the crowd entertained by chanting phrases over the beats. This vocal party-rocking eventually morphed into what we now consider rapping.

    https://medium.com/cuepoint/ultimate-breaks-beats-an-oral-history-74937f932026

    R-1075570-1190235838.jpeg.jpg



    https://www.discogs.com/sell/release/1075570?ev=rb

    Edit.

    Here's a mix that Kid Capri did just using the Ultimate Breaks & Beats records.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fXABSJNRi8&list=RDQMYYOtXM5Pv7g
  • LUClEN
    LUClEN Members Posts: 20,559 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Funk (e.g., James Brown, etc.)
    Plutarch wrote: »
    THE_R_ wrote: »
    JAZZ & REGGAE

    Jazz? Care to explain?

    The improvisation in hip-hop and freestyle rap
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    ^^^ In my earlier post I posted the Ultimate Breaks & Beats compilation, which is where the DJs got the breaks from.

    In the next posts I'll post some 70s rap albums that came out before Rappers Delight.


    The Last Poets -Self Titled (Full Album)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTQlhXij66g

    The Last Poets - This Is Madness (Full Album)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKb5OiX8ag8&list=PLC2WRbXIfFwQD6GbJtUi20zMr9XMp8wEL

    The Last Poets -Chastisement (Full Album)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-2iB-ibV8s
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)

    LAST POETS BIOGRAPHY


    Last Poets were rappers of the civil rights era. Along with the changing domestic landscape came the New York City-hip group called The Last Poets, who used obstreperous verse to chide a nation whose inclination was to maintain the colonial yoke around the neck of the disenfranchised.

    Shortly after the death of Martin Luther King, The Last Poets were born. David Nelson, Gylan Kain, and Abiodun Oyewole, were born on the anniversary of Malcolm X's birthday May 19, 1968 in Marcus Garvey Park. They grew from three poets and a drummer to seven young black and Hispanic artists: David Nelson, Gylan Kain, Abiodun Oyewole, Felipe Luciano, Umar Bin Hassan, Jalal Nurridin, and Suliamn El Hadi (Gil Scott Heron was never a member of the group). They took their name from a poem by South African poet Willie Kgositsile, who posited the necessity of putting aside poetry in the face of looming revolution.

    http://www.math.buffalo.edu/~sww/LAST-POETS/last_poets0.html

    So in 1970 four of the members of The Last Poets recorded a self titled album, The Last Poets

    In 1971, the other three members of The Last Poets made a documentary called Right On!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkEatBhpSLs
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    In the meanwhile, while The Last Poets were making noise in New York City, The Watts Prophets made two albums in California around the same time.


    The Black Voices - On The Streets Of Watts

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kU8X3GQOOqo&list=PLqmz-EmBiq0Mu67m5Si_ntIeVriz5fDpP

    The Watts Prophets - Rappin Black In A White World

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ExY6cSXx2A&list=PLqmz-EmBiq0OTiY_qkKUYs_SjhkKMHPv7
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    And not to leave out the early female rappers, Nicki Giovanni recorded three rap albums in the early 70s.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=? _eMkZFhU&t=720s
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    Jalal Nuridden of The Last Poets made a solo album with Kool & The Gang. It is a concept album that tells of the story of a hustler and his ace boon ? that gets out of jail.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zysJyAtTQx0
  • THE_R_
    THE_R_ Members Posts: 3,444 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Plutarch wrote: »
    THE_R_ wrote: »
    JAZZ & REGGAE

    Jazz? Care to explain?

    Reggae? Yeah.
    "When Did Reggae Become Rap?"

    When did Jamaican dance hall reggae become rap? Are we not putting the carriage before the horse? Contrary to what many may say Rap can trace its origins directly from Jamaican Dub Reggae & Jamaican style toasting. It is a fact that isn’t talked about by many in the main stream media but many of the early pioneers (DJ Herc) and newer rappers (Busta Rhymes, Notorious B.I.G and Redman) in the American rap era are Jamaican immigrants or children of Jamaican immigrants in NY. One does not have to look very far to see the relationship between the two as we now see rap and dancehall reggae merging. This would not be possible if there were not the similarities as the child is now beginning to return to the parent. Jamaican dejaying came out of a form a rhyming and talking over music called “Toasting”. Rapping began as a variation on the toasting

    Jamaican sound systems (Mobile Discotheques) have been toasting since the early 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. Jamaican toasting was developed at blues dances which were free dances mainly in Jamaican ghettos where sound systems battled each other playing American R& B, Jamaican Ska and Rock Steady. Popular dance venues included Foresters Hall, Twary Crescent (Duke, Sir ? Sound, King Edwards, Mighty Bell), & Central Road. Surprisingly some of the earliest signs of toasting can be found in songs by folk historian and entertainer the Honorable Dr. Louise Bennett-Coverley fondly known to many as “Miss Lou”.

    The sound systems had a Deejay whose primary responsibility was to play the records and then there was the MC who was responsible for setting the mood with the crowd by “toasting”. Record producers used to leave one side of a new 45 with just the instruments or “rhythm” which was called “the version of the song”. These versions are where many of MCs of the sound systems in Jamaica would do a rhyme or toast to entertain the audience. MC’s would battle each other (just like rappers did) to see who could do the best rhyme or toast. They would cover topics ranging from what people were wearing at the dance, to culture, politics and commentary. Like the early beginning of its predecessor rap; most of it was good natured and humorous. The rhyme started with phrases like ‘wuk it up man’.

    Ewart ‘U-Roy’ Beckford, King Sporty, Dennis Alcapone, Scotty, Prince Buster, Sir Coxsone, Duke Reid are all early leaders in toasting in Jamaica. They would be followed later by deejays like Big Youth, Jah Stitch and I Roy. They were followed by Yellowman, Charlie Chaplin and General Echo.

    Duke Reid was one of Jamaica’s most popular early DJ’s. He was known to wear outrageous costumes. His most popular costume was a dark cloak where he hid his cowboy holster and guns. You could also hear “toasting” on the radio during 1958- 1959 on the Treasure Isles time Radio Program with King Sporty.

    Many of the artists involved in the birth of rap in New York were either Jamaican or have Jamaican parentage. The seeds were planted for rap music when Jamaican Clive ‘Kool Herc’ Campbell migrated to the Bronx NY 1967 at age 13. He put together a sound system patterned off what he saw growing up in Jamaica and started to draw crowds to his dances. Influenced by the Jamaican style of toasting he used this technique on American R&B, funk, disco, soul and funk. During the song’s 30-40 sec instrumental break he would “toast”. He realized he needed a way to extend the instrumental break so he started to experiment with 2 turntables. He was the first to use two turntables techniques to extend the break by playing the same record. This allowed more ‘toasting’ which like its Jamaican counterpart encouraged people to dance. He pioneered “breaks” in songs. He recruited dancers as a part of his MC dance team. These dancers would be featured mainly during the breaks and would later be called break-dancers. Campbell was just one of the many Jamaicans who influence rap directly.

    Today we have Beenie man, Elephant man and Sean Paul who are now influencing Rap. Without a doubt Jamaican deejay style was the foundation for American rap music and needs to be recognized as such.

    A few Sources: Evolution of Rap by Steven Hager, The Rough Guide to Reggae by Steve Barrow, Cut N Mix by ? Hebdige, The Tennors (Rock Steady/Reggae group), Derrick Morgan (King of Ska).

    "When Did Reggae Become Rap?"

    TO BE FAIR...JAZZ IS THE PRECURSOR OF MOST MODERN GENRES OF MUSIC. IF IT WASN'T FOR JAZZ EVERYTHING WOULD SOUND LIKE MOVIE SCORES. AS FAR AS RAP GOES...THERE WOULD BE NO BREAKBEATS IF IT WASN'T FOR THE PIONEERS OF JAZZ MUSIC.
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    Last but not least, Gil Scott Heron made several albums with spoken word poetry. His earliest record is Small Talk at 125th and Lenox

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dpxb4GWSYi8&list=PLaTQ5c871jUARdRncxkW_TchqXT1ALPhV
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    1*sIJRoyjRxeSQaIiwgjMVsA.gif

    The Ultimate Breaks & Beats series was put together by Breakbeat Lenny and Breakbeat Lou. Breakbeat Lenny died in 1991 around the time they stopped making the series.

    So every once in a while Breakbeat Lou does an interview and discusses how he and Breakbeat Lenny put the compilation together.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_UjCeYFuX0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-h1ji0h8Fu4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HVrPZVgdp0
  • MECCA1000
    MECCA1000 Members Posts: 2,756 ✭✭✭✭✭
    All the above .......
  • 5 Grand
    5 Grand Members Posts: 12,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2017
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    Afrika Bambaataa's Favorite Breaks

    This list was published in the British magazine Blues and Soul in the year 1988. Here, he lists his favorite break beats and jams that can get a dance floor pumpin. I wanted to add this because I could not believe how similar this list is to my own. Amazing. If you don't have most of these songs, I suggest you pick them up ASAP. This list is published in the book Ego Trip's book of rap lists.

    1. "Apache" - Incredible ? Band (Pride, 1973)
    -the break from this song is used in the Sugar Hill Gang tune "Jump On It."
    2. "Jam on the Groove" - Ralph MacDonald (Tk, 1976)
    3. "Theme From Star Wars" - Dave Matthews (CTI, 1977)
    4. "Catch A Groove" - Juice (Greedy, 1976)
    5. "Reach Out in the Darkness" - Friend and Lover (Verve, 1968)
    6. "Minimum Wage" - Rock and Roll**
    7. "Give It Up Or Turn It Loose" - James Brown (King, 1969)
    8. "Get Up I Feel Like Being a Sex Machine" - James Brown (King, 1969)
    9. "Sing a Simple Song" - Sly & The Family Stone (Epic, 1969)
    10. "You're The One" - Little Sister (Stoneflower, 1970)
    11. "It's Just Begun" - Jimmy Castor Bunch (RCA, 1972)
    12. "Dance to the Drummer's Beat" - Human Kelly & Life (TK, 1976)
    13. "Scorpio" - Dennis Coffey (Sussex, 1971)
    14. "Ride Sally Ride" - Dennis Coffey (Sussex, 1972)
    15. "Son of Scorpio" - Dennis Coffey (Sussex, 1972)
    16. Willie Dynamite Soundtrack - J.J. Johnson and Various Artists (MCA, 1974)
    17. "Take Me to the Mardi Gras" - Bob James (CTI, 1976)
    18. "Let a Woman be a Woman (Let a Man be a Man)" - ? & The Blazers (Original Sound 1969)
    19. "Funky Broadway" - ? & The Blazers (Original, 1967)
    20. "The Champ" - The Mohawks (Cotillion, 1968)
    21. "? " - Otis Redding and Carla Thomas (Stax, 1967)
    22. "Groove to Get Down" - T-Connection (TK, 1977)
    23. "Get Off Your Ass and Jam" - Funkadelic (Westbound, 1975)
    -this is the anthem of the Rare Grooves Society-
    24. "Give the Drummer Some" - Little Milton**
    25. "Get on the Good Foot" - James Brown (Polydor, 1972)
    26. "Funky Drummer" - James Brown (King, 1970)
    -the funky drummer on this track is Madison's very own Clyde Stubblefield-
    27. "Keep on Doin' What You're Doin'" - Bobby Byrd (Brownstone, 1971)
    28. "I Know You Got Soul" - Bobby Byrd (King, 1971)
    29. "Think (About It)" - Lyn Collins (People, 1972)
    30. "It's My Thing" - Marva Whitney (King, 1969)
    31. "Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved" - James Brown (King, 1970)
    32. "? Tonk Women" - The Rolling Stones (London, 1969)
    33. "Hot Stuff" - Rolling Stones (Rolling Stones, 1976)
    34. "Dance to the Music" - Sly & The Family Stone (Epic, 1968)
    35. "Family Affair" - Sly & The Family Stone (Epic, 1971)
    36. "Jam" - Grand Central Station (Warner Bros., 1975)
    37. "Joyous" - Pleasure (Fantasy, 1976)
    38. "Rock Creek Park" - The Blackbyrds (Fantasy, 1976)
    39. "Happy Music" - The Blackbyrds (Fantasy, 1975)
    40. "Africano" - Earth, Wind, & Fire (Columbia, 1975)
    41. "Shining Star" - Earth, Wind, & Fire (Columbia, 1975)
    42. "Power" - Earth, Wind, & Fire (Columbia, 1972)
    43. "Ring My Bell" - Anita Ward (TK, 1979)
    44. "The Funk Is On" - Instant Funk (Salsoul, 1980)
    45. "Funky Stuff" - Kool & The Gang (De-Lite, 1973)
    46. "Jungle Boogie" - Kool & The Gang (De-Lite, 1973)
    47. "Flashlight" - Parliament (Casablanca, 1977)
    48. "More Bounce to the Ounce" - Zapp (Warner Bros., 1980)
    49. "Dancin' Kid" - Disco Tex and the Sex-O-Lettes (Chelsea, 1976)
    50. "The Breakdown" - Rufus Thomas (Stax, 1972)
    51. "Do The Funky Penguin" - Rufus Thomas (Stax, 1972)
    52. "Shakara" - Fela Ransom Kuti (Editions, Makossa, 1974)
    53. "Brother Green (The Disco King)" - Roy Ayers Ubiquity (Polydor, 1975)
    54. "Lonsome Cowboy" - Roy Ayers Ubiquity (Polydor, 1976)
    55. "Yellow Sunshine" - Yellow Sunshine (Gamble, 1973)

    It should be noted that these tracks are in no particular order. It is also interesting to note the prevalence of things related to James Brown (Bobby Byrd, Marva Whitney, Lyn Collins, etc.), and Miami soul (aka TK Records). The songs with "**" next to it are off of records that either do not exist or are so rare that Afrika Bambaataa is the only person who owns them. If any of you happen to stumble upon any of these recordings, please contact me immediately. That would be sweet.



    http://jeffontheradio.blogspot.com/2008/03/afrika-bambaataas-favorite-breaks.html
  • CashmoneyDux
    CashmoneyDux Members Posts: 11,217 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Soul (e.g., Gil Scott-Heron, etc.)
    Gospel deserves an honorable mention