About once a week in America, a Toddler shoots someone.

Swiffness!
Swiffness! Members Posts: 10,128 ✭✭✭✭✭
Remember: trigger locks/gun safes/any-sort-of-security-for-firearms-whatsoever ? because you need to have your guns LOADED AND READY TO MURDER SOMEONE AT ALL TIMES 24/7 365 in case zombies/obama/ISIS attack!


This week a 2-year-old in South Carolina found a gun in the back seat of the car he was riding in and accidentally shot his grandmother, who was sitting in the passenger seat. This type of thing happens from time to time: a little kid finds a gun, fires it, and hurts or kills himself or someone else. These cases rarely bubble up to the national level except when someone, like a parent, ends up dead.

In August, for instance, a 21-month-old in the St. Louis area found a loaded handgun at his grandmother's house and shot himself in the torso. His mother took him to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Earlier in the year a Michigan 3-year-old found a loaded .40-caliber handgun in a closet while his dad and brother were outside. He shot himself in the head and died before rescue workers arrived.

The stories go on and on like this: Roughly once a week this year, on average, a small child has found a gun, pointed it at himself or someone else, and pulled the trigger. Boys are disproportionately likely to do this: I could find only three cases where a girl under the age of 4 wounded someone with a gun. In 13 of the 43 total incidents, a child's self-inflicted injuries were fatal. In two other cases, another person died after being shot by a toddler: a father in Alabama, and a 1-year-old in Ohio.

In one instance, a 3-year-old managed to wound both of his parents with a single gunshot at an Albuquerque motel.

Shootings by toddlers have happened in 24 states so far this year. Missouri has seen the most, with five separate incidents. Florida has had four. Texas, three. Due to the low number of total cases and the isolated nature of these incidents I'd caution against drawing broad conclusions from the map above. But it is worth noting that the shootings don't necessarily follow broader population trends. California, the most populous state in the nation, hasn't had any. Nobody has been shot by a toddler in New England or the Upper Midwest.

These numbers are probably an undercount. There are likely instances of toddlers shooting people that result in minor injuries and no media coverage. And there are probably many more cases where a little kid inadvertently shoots a gun and doesn't hit anyone, resulting in little more than a scared kid and (hopefully) chastened parents.

Notably, these numbers don't include cases where toddlers are shot, intentionally or otherwise, by older children or adults. Dozens of preschoolers are killed in acts of homicide each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But I haven't included those figures here.

These cases are invariably referred to as "accidents" in media reports. But as Everytown for Gun Safety, a group that advocates for stricter gun laws, argues, many incidents like this are preventable. In a study of accidental shootings by children of all ages (not just toddlers), they estimate that "more than two-thirds of these tragedies could be avoided if gun owners stored their guns responsibly and prevented children from accessing them."

There are policy and technical responses to preventable childhood gun deaths as well. States and localities could require guns to be locked up at home, a policy supported by 67 percent of Americans. Various types of smart gun technology, which prevent anyone other than their owners from firing a given gun, exist as well. But gun lock requirements and smart guns have been vehemently opposed by the National Rifle Association and its allies.

Instead, the NRA continues to promote a response that seeks to solve gun problems with more guns, and aims to broaden the saturation of firearms in nearly every sphere of public and private life, from homes to schools to churches to bars to airports and beyond. In a country with more guns than people, it's only natural that a certain number of small children are going get their hands on an unsecured firearm, with tragic consequences.


Depending on where you stand on gun policy, you may feel that 13 dead toddlers in 10 months is too many. Or, you might reason that stuff happens, and that this is part of the price we must pay to protect our gun rights.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonkblog/wp/2015/10/14/people-are-getting-shot-by-toddlers-on-a-weekly-basis-this-year/?tid=sm_tw
janklow wrote:
GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD GUNS ARE GOOD

Comments

  • BiblicalAtheist
    BiblicalAtheist Members Posts: 15,668 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Do not help the stupid people live and have children!!
  • janklow
    janklow Members, Moderators Posts: 8,613 Regulator
    Swiffness! wrote: »
    Remember: trigger locks/gun safes/any-sort-of-security-for-firearms-whatsoever ? because you need to have your guns LOADED AND READY TO MURDER SOMEONE AT ALL TIMES 24/7 365 in case zombies/obama/ISIS attack!
    so i will just answer this with a serious response of: no, but like all laws, the devil's in the details.
    laws that punish parents for letting kids get access to their guns? i live in a state that has that, they're fine, depending on the judgment of the prosecutors.
    laws that mandate trigger locks/safes? well, we have one of those too and the execution is... kinda of awkward. but in practice, aside from the financial aspect, here's how it works: responsible people who have big-ass gun safes have to pay for awkward locks with their firearms (ask me about how i got a mandatory internal lock for my SAM7K made) even though the while a dumb-ass throws the lock away and lets his baby play with the gun.

    i want my laws based on logic, not emotion.

    and don't worry, Swiffness, i have a safe.
    Swiffness! wrote: »
    There are policy and technical responses to preventable childhood gun deaths as well. States and localities could require guns to be locked up at home, a policy supported by 67 percent of Americans. Various types of smart gun technology-
    hint: if the author is referring to the excellence of "smart gun technology," he's too ? stupid to trust on the issue of guns.
    Swiffness! wrote: »
    But gun lock requirements and smart guns have been vehemently opposed by the National Rifle Association and its allies.
    no... as always, the issue is the specifics. voluntary smart gun tech? no one cares. MANDATORY smart gun tech? that's the issue.
    Swiffness! wrote: »
    Depending on where you stand on gun policy, you may feel that 13 dead toddlers in 10 months is too many. Or, you might reason that stuff happens, and that this is part of the price we must pay to protect our gun rights.
    ...or these two choices being the only two options is a furiously false choice presented by a biased author who's not actually interested in discussing the topic like an adult.
    Swiffness! wrote: »
    oh, wait, it's a Christopher Ingraham piece. i know he's on a "write an anti-gun article a day" schedule, so i bet we can find some where he cites ? Shooting Tracker stats.
  • john581
    john581 Members Posts: 75
  • skpjr78
    skpjr78 Members Posts: 7,311 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Inb4 it takes a good toddler with a gun to stop a bad toddler with a gun
  • WholeLottaGangSyht
    WholeLottaGangSyht Members Posts: 94 ✭✭
    im still pro ?
  • janklow
    janklow Members, Moderators Posts: 8,613 Regulator
    skpjr78 wrote: »
    Inb4 it takes a good toddler with a gun to stop a bad toddler with a gun
    sorry, boss, i'm about legit policies, not catchphrases

  • KLICHE
    KLICHE Members Posts: 5,061 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think I speak for everyone when I say if a toddler shoots a gun, that KILLS someone, they should be judged as an adult and be executed